With an intimidating boss

29-May-2017 19:21

This person could be your boss – someone with genuine positional power over you.Anything you do is scrutinized, challenged or faces disagreement. The opportunities are abundant when you stop allowing fear to get the better of you. You might make a new friend, a new career connection or get a date!Some of these intimidating behaviors include, but are not limited to, verbally abusing you by yelling and screaming, putting you down and ridiculing you in front of others along with sabotaging or stealing credit for your work.It can also include other offensive nonverbal actions like creating circumstances that limits your ability to do your job and get your work done on time or at all..Think about your default response, as much as theirs.Consider what prejudices you bring to the table as much as what this person might bring.

If you are experiencing these intimidating behaviors where you work, then we would encourage you to seek help right away.

You’re quiet and don’t speak up to avoid being attacked. This person might even be a subordinate – somebody who works for you (believe me, this happens more than you might think.) You probably sense a lack of ‘parity’– that you don’t have the right to engage with this person at the same level.

Or this person could be a colleague – someone who uses clever words and exerts personal power or expert power that you believe you can’t compete with.

In the last couple of decades, the amount of workers who admit that they have been the victim of a bully at work has been steadily growing more and more.

By 2011, 50% of the people surveyed admitted to being subjected to rude behavior at a minimum of once every week which is an unprecedented increase of 25% since 1998.

If you are experiencing these intimidating behaviors where you work, then we would encourage you to seek help right away.

You’re quiet and don’t speak up to avoid being attacked. This person might even be a subordinate – somebody who works for you (believe me, this happens more than you might think.) You probably sense a lack of ‘parity’– that you don’t have the right to engage with this person at the same level.

Or this person could be a colleague – someone who uses clever words and exerts personal power or expert power that you believe you can’t compete with.

In the last couple of decades, the amount of workers who admit that they have been the victim of a bully at work has been steadily growing more and more.

By 2011, 50% of the people surveyed admitted to being subjected to rude behavior at a minimum of once every week which is an unprecedented increase of 25% since 1998.

Similarly, I introduced myself and asked a bit about her and her work. When I shared that he does come across as a little aloof he was surprised as it is the opposite of his intention.